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.m. eastern. >> through election day, what are coverage. coming up next, the u.s. air relations. including the discussion of the relationship between u.s., israel, and iran. then we will hear the "washington post" cybersecurity summit. we have several live events to tell you about tomorrow. gregorie dinero will be on to discuss the future of the army. and president obama's campaign rally at the university of colorado, boulder. that is on c-span. [cheers] [applause] >> all right, let's get what documents the coolidge family during the white house years. and also before. >> part of the coolidge family papers. we have one box of photographs. then we have several boxes of other documents. photographs are heavy. the album should be in the back here. here it is. unfortunately, it is on lack civics paper. there's not much we can do about that because we don't want to change the artifact nature of the album itself. starting to crack, some of these pages are separating. this is a photograph of calvin coolidge the day before he became president. he was in plymouth, vermont, visiting his father, doin
the coaches and even leaks because many of the links i work with our code. they are not governed by u.s.a. football for pop warner. these guys can't come down. scott can't come until every coach in the united states of america this is the way you need to do it. so what we try to do at the league had to share this as an example that this is what you're fighting with the aggressors level is number one, coach kerri campbell and i went to a lake. we said this. you know i want to do? we played at the highest level, so there is a model standard. authority out there. the nfl authority set a standard for youth coaches in america. the problem is they don't embrace the changes because it's all about winning. win at all costs mentality. winning is good, but nobody remembers years from now. what matters is the effects of the game. so what we tried to do was, okay, if you guys want to improve safety and you want to improve coming you know, making sure coaches are responsiblefor me being accountable and credible, then implement the leagues are just like the nfl pa. they protect the west players. they
part of the historic results of this last week where he had 20 women in the u.s. senate, and historic number and rebecca rightly reminded us that it was in part because of things like emily's list that i want to have a conversation about the kind of institutions and the organizations that have been working quiet they all this time to make this moment possible. i don't have to say something about emily's list. >> families list within washington politics, it is an incredibly powerful force. at some point they were the largest organization. i don't know if that's still true, in the day of the super pacs, they are not the largest anybody. so emily's list is an organization that supports democratic pro-choice women for all kinds of offices around the country. they are very powerful and have been working really hard for a long time to get more women effect did. other celebration about the creator of the woman, sometimes you want to say this is terrific progress in other times you say wow, 20%. but it's very, very work getting women elected. so i cited emily's list because they're the bigge
significant emphasis. for example, in 2010, the pentagon set up this u.s. cybercommand and the eu has a similar organization. the uk has the same thing. they have a cybersecurity operations center and this is the british equivalent in this area. let's just go through some of the terminology. i wanted to make sure that we have some particular knowledge about things. as i go through these special events, the backdoor is an overlooked entry into a network. it allows a hacker or someone were someone who was not authorized to be in there to get in with a password -- without a password. this is where you have a program that becomes a robot of the person on the outside. cookies are a friend when we are trying to order something. i'm going to give you some examples as we go. now where is malicious software. malware can be a virus 40 warm. we also have the concept where did these e-mails that are alluring you to respond. you might even respond to such a little ad. spearfishing is trying to get you to respond and it is that is the concept that it is targeted at you. because you have access to s
before we did the plan, the u.s. was a system of mexico with $36 million. here we are, this neighbor that's so important to us, we're assisting. at the same time, the united states will give 25 #% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federa
question will go to representative berg. how would you have voted on the farm bill passed by the u.s. senate? in your view what are the necessary elements of a good farm bill? berg: certainly had said publicly. if there were the only choice i would support the farm bill. there are challenges with it. it links wetlands and crop insurance to a lot of people in north dakota. you know, my great-grandfather homestead in north dakota. i am an econ grad and i grew up in north dakota. my dad was a commissioner in agriculture is extremely important to me. what we need in agriculture and long term is we need the markets. we need the farm bill and a strong arm bill centered on crop insurance, absolutely no question that we need to ensure that open markets and a place is the price we need for a great quality crops in north dakota. the challenge we have in the house is the house ag committee pass the farm bill as well. that did not come out of the chamber and didn't come to the floor and i thought back -- fought back against republican leadership very hard on that specific thing. i worked biparti
, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what happens with those sectors of the bureaucracy in the arab world will let her sleep determined the fate of
. you have been quoted as saying that there are very likely as many or more spies working against u.s. interests inside the u.s. during the cold war, which was a head snapping quote when i read it. who are these people and what are they after? >> i don't know that. i've been on the government for six years, but if you look at the value of intelligence, importance of intelligence in the expenditures of resources by china, by russia, but others and look for them is one of the biggest is. well it's the u.s. not only national security secrets, the commercial seats as be of much of can be gleaned or stolen from cyberspace. it is a dire threat in part because we shifted so much attention, so much resource and the counterterrorism arena we've forgotten the necessity of old-fashioned counterintelligence and that's an important element of this. >> often i've heard some people involved in counterintelligence tends to be seen as the redheaded stepchild of the intelligence world. why is that when we need it and what is the cure for a? effect in part because it's something we don't want to think a
've run out of steam. >> i feel like i'm back in the u.s. election talking about the travails of the 1%. let's broaden the discussion. we'll bring in some more diverse voices from different people, different is. anybody want to enter the conversation, just raise your hand, calling you. people with makes will state their, affiliation and ask a question or make a comment. any questions or comments from the floor? yes, over here. >> thank you. i would like to ask you the following question. you have mentioned a number of tools such as cyberweapons, such as drones and special forces. they are not in themselves. they are just tools. to achieve what is the big issue it was a smart move, but he didn't resolve the iranian problems. same for other places. so my question is, don't you think that there is some kind of an biggie t. trying to use new, smart technology, that kind of stuff, pretending to get solutions and at the same time, let's say the political diplomatic approach doesn't provide solution in the end. so, isn't it a signal that we are shifting from her politics and diplomacy and rel
among the panelists that rankings like u.s. news and world report are, shall we say, flawed, and not basedded on outcome, and, yet, universities widely promote the fact that they are -- they gain standing in those rankings, and sometimes you can use those at goals. does that make anybody uncomfortable? does that lend credibility to the rankings? are we just stuck with that fact or is there another approach? >> i think if you look at the web page of any university, what you'll see on the web page is whatever publicity the university is getting, and i mean, i actually have done research that shows when you fall in the rankings, all sorts of bad things happen. fewer people apply. it's more difficult to get the students to come. you have to give more financial aid. test scores go down. the rankings do matter, and people say they don't pay attention to them, but that's not the only thing they pay attention to, and so, you know, i think the message is, you can convey on your web pages and written documentation what are values, what are we proud of, and hopefully public research un
.n. backing and there is no way it could be the u.s. alone, imperialistic attack to try to scoop up resources for yourself. >> hearing the talk, i have seen this movie before. saying that they will pick legitimate people within the country to do that -- tom friedman back it up, please. i saw. i saw the first time. you guys were all in school at the time. let's just let things happen the way they are going to happen. what other people worry about their own country. we have not problems in this country. >> jim, did you have anything to say? >> yes, i do have one question i can ask, it was george w. bush who wanted to do the libyan intervention, would you have supported it then? >> yes. >> okay, let's do something related to military and foreign policy and that is the issue of military spending. many on the left criticize the right for wanting to spend on the military print mitt romney has proposed that we spend $2 trillion in additional spending. lots of things, wanting to balance a budget, the annual deficit runs between one and $1.5 billion annually. i will start with you, bill. even with oba
with those that were at the creation, the architect of the u.s. china relationship. it is sometimes, at least my sense, is there is a little bit of scolding about gosh, we did it this way forty years ago. so you sort of lost the hang of it. i would simply say the strategy that you adopt when you are trying to lure zen phobic general inward looking undergopped nation out in to the world are incredibly difficult, different from the strategies that you apply when you're dealing with the country that is rising faster than any country in history. with a very strong sense of itself, strong sense of nationalism, and how you engage and shape their global choices. and so i think it will be the dominant feature of american foreign policy going forward. i believe we will have a welcoming asia that wants a stronger engaged america. that's the biggest difference from my tenure to the tenure of the gentlemen. in the past, there was often some -- [inaudible] about the united states. no longer. everyone in asia wants more of the united states. and our job will be to see if we have the wisdom to sustain a ver
for the u.s. senate, the battle is over and this is the first time that really cemented it. >> it would've worked? >> i think they deserve some level of decency. oftentimes, the public would use it in a very quiet way. we didn't see hardly any evidence of that in the cycle. but still, it will come back in certain places. it is a credit to someone like tammy baldwin, who did her work. someone who is dignified, it means that we have elected senators and presidents eventually end that sexual orientation is not the primary issue in the campaign. >> so how did you turn that around? how did you and that? >> well, if you look, patrick and i were in that same hotel in san francisco on election night. you look at all that has happened in the movement in just the last four years. these campaigns and all the organizations in the movement have gotten very sophisticated. they came out of it with a sort of sugarcoated hate campaign. he used to come out of the very direct and overt thing. all the advertisements they came at us during proposition eight, it will focus on schools instead of what was on t
agency of energy, not us or -- they announced that in 2020 the u.s. is going to be the number one producer of oil in the world. for all of our troubles, the drag is us. >> shame on us for that. [laughter] [talking over each other] [talking over each other] >> all right, we will be expecting that. >> this is not the first time that the work was ignored. >> they recommended getting rid of a lot of the tax credit -- and end the recommendations disappeared. [talking over each other] because i'm looking for my commission report. [laughter] >> he started going back in the president's desk. but simpson-bowles has had more staying power than a lot of commission reports. it is a guideline and it is the next iteration of simpson-bowles. it is clarification and bottoming. it is valuable. we are at a crux, a breaking point, frankly. with the future of this country. i think something has to be done in lame-duck section and i think that things will be done. and then we need to deal with the longer-term issue next year. the groundwork is laid. president, john boehner, harry reid, and senator mcc
. >> this is one of a number that we have held forth in a series of committee hearings on amtrak and u.s. passenger rail power. we actually have two more scheduled. one will be on thursday, december 3, novel focus on high-speed and intercity passenger rail. the grant program. and then we will have the final hearing on this important subject. thursday's 13, of december, that will be on the northeast corridor. ironically, it is looking at some of the flood and storm damage, many of the transportation and infrastructure was impacted by a huge amount of damage. new york city is incredibly resilient. they are coming back well. they have about 95% of the city that was hit. i understand that mayor bloomberg will be in town today. the committee oversees and the transportation infrastructure i might also recall in the northeast corridor, when i became chair of the committee, in the northeast quarter, the progress we have made sense that hearing has took place, it is kind of interesting about choosing topics and we have to reflect the moment. a lot of people when they go home, they go to bed and they count s
. named one of the most 100 powerful arab women last year, appears on u.s. cable news channels quite often and the founder and chairman of the independent think tank beirut institute. safeen, a member of the kurdistan democratic party. he's also a member of the -- was a standing-in member of the iraqi governing council of the authority in 2004. he was exiled to the u.k. and returned to his homeland and is playing a very key role in its development in the kurdistan province. let's make it a conversation, more oprah, fewer speeches, and hopefully everybody gets involved shortly. i want to begin by asking all the panelists to take a bird's eye view first. how you see the flow happening in the region generally, in syria in particular, and where do you see some connections happening. afra, would you like to begin? >> hello, everyone. good morning. i'm replacing my colleague from the syria national council. i was slightly surprised he chose me because he knows i'm in the non-violent movement in syria, and i'm doing my ph.d. on the non-violent movement in syria, and so it's quite a privilege to b
. it is not just a matter of policy but it's a matter of people. as representatives go by, the many u.s. citizens who travel to mexico and obviously the incredible contribution that mexican-americans made to our economy and our society and to our politics. >> [speaking in native tongue] roi >> i know the president has a very ambitious reform agenda, and we are very much looking forward to having a fruitful discussion here today about not only how we can strengthen our economic ties, our trade ties, our coordination along the border, and improving our joint competitiveness as well as common security issues. but i think what i hope the president-elect is also interested in is a discussion about both of the regional and global issues because mexico has become not simply an important bilateral partner, but is today a very important multilateral, multinational leader on a whole range of issues from energy to climate change, and we look forward to working with mexico not only on regional issues but also on global issues. >> [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native tongue] [speaking in native ton
this contaminated drug. we don't want excuses but we don't want to leave this law on big u.s. because you are always sued if you act and if you assume you have the authority when you don't your call before the committee to save how could you have authority when congress didn't give it to you? i think we have to put our partisanship aside, the election is over, figure out a clear law for the federal government to be able to act because with all due respect, this is not a state issue of drugs being shipped around the country. thank you mr. chairman. >> sure and i will be the first of recognized the chairman of the fda. >> you might not want that job. >> the dr. burgess you are recognized. >> thank you mr. chairman and something that was very important and i don't want to get lost in the translation. representative blackburn asked about e-mails between the fda regional office and the massachusetts board of pharmacy and mr. chairman may i suggest those e-mails are a critical part of our investigation and we must receive those. is it necessary to submit subpoena authority. >> if the gentleman with the.
. that achievement would jeopardize u.s. national security interests, would pose an existential threat to the state of israel and would result in a regional nuclear arms race that would further destabilize the region. the news out of iran is dire. just this week, the director of the international atomic energy administration told the press that iran has not slowed its enrichment activities. the international atomic energy administration also suspects that iran has conducted live tests of conventional explosives that could be used to detonate a nuclear weapon at the military base, the facility the iranians have denied access to by the international atomic energy administration. between may and august of this year, iran doubled the number of centrifuges at its fortified facility buried deep inside a mountain to protect it against strikes. iran now has over 2,140 centrifuges for enriching uranium, and it continues to enrich to 20%. iran claims it needs this higher grade uranium for its peaceful nuclear program, but a country with peaceful ambitions doesn't enrich uranium in defiance of u.n. security c
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19